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National Child Benefit progress report: 2003

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Author: 
Federal/Provincial/Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services
Format: 
government document
Publication Date: 
6 Apr 2005
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PDF icon HS1-3-2003-eng.pdf3.3 MB

Excerpted fromĀ press release:

The National Child Benefit (NCB) Progress Report: 2003 released by the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services confirms that government investments for low-income families with children continue to increase. Federal support to low-income families in 2002-2003 had risen from $5.6 billion in 2001-2002 to $5.7 billion in 2002-2003. It is projected to reach $6.4 billion in 2004-2005. The report further shows that provincial and territorial governments and First Nations have increased their expenditures for low-income children and families through the National Child Benefit initiative to $764.2 million in 2002-2003. This funding supports programs and services, including child benefits and earned income supplements, child/day care initiatives, early childhood services and children-at-risk services, youth initiatives, and supplementary health benefits. The National Child Benefit (NCB) Progress Report: 2003 is the fifth in a series of progress reports published since the National Child Benefit was launched in 1998. The report offers updated information on the activities of Canada's federal, provincial, and territorial governments and First Nations to improve the well-being of children in low-income families through the NCB initiative. This year's report also highlights for the first time provincial and territorial NCB investments in initiatives for youth, especially youth at risk. The Government of Canada contributes to the National Child Benefit initiative through a supplement to its Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) system. This additional payment is called the NCB Supplement. It provides extra support to low-income families with children by topping up the monthly payments they receive under the CCTB system. Since 1998, the Government of Canada has steadily increased its investment in children and their families through the Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB base benefit and NCB Supplement). In Budget 2003, the Government of Canada announced a long-term plan of further increases in the NCB Supplement. As a result, by the year 2007-2008, the annual federal investment to support Canadian families with children through the combined base benefit of the Canada Child Tax Benefit and the NCB Supplement is projected to reach $10 billion.

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